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The Birth of Galahad Richard Hovey

The Birth of Galahad

Richard Hovey

Published September 30th 2002
ISBN : 9781410100368
Paperback
132 pages
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 About the Book 

Born in Illinois in 1864 and educated at Dartmouth (where many of the songs he wrote as class poet are still sung), Richard Hovey next studied art in Washington and then theology in New York City before becoming a newspaper reporter in Boston --MoreBorn in Illinois in 1864 and educated at Dartmouth (where many of the songs he wrote as class poet are still sung), Richard Hovey next studied art in Washington and then theology in New York City before becoming a newspaper reporter in Boston -- where he met the Canadian poet Bliss Carman, with whom so much of his poetry would be written. Issuing his first volume of verse at 16, Dartmouth benefited of his presence by the many tributary verses, fraternity songs and odes, that he wrote in their honor. Choosing to do a little acting in order to become a better playwright, he soon thereafter wrote the first of his dramatic poems Lancelot and Guenevere which contained The Quest of Merlin and The Marriage of Guenevere. Moving to France the following year, he befriended the French Symbolists Verlaine, Mallarme and Maeterlinck, by whom he was greatly influenced. Translating Maeterlincks works, he went on to publish Songs of Vagabondia, co-written with Bliss Carmen, in 1894. The poems inspired collegians who took to chanting his words. Ultimately a professor of literature at Barnard College, Hovey died during a minor operation (at age 35) at the very beginning of the new century, February 24, 1900, with his fame assured.The Birth of Galahad is the finest of the trilogy, both in sustained strength of the poetry and in dramatic unity. - George Hamlin Fitch, in the San Francisco ChronicleIt is written with notable power, showing a strong dramatic understanding and a clear dramatic instinct. Mr. Hovey took his risk when he boldly entered Tennysons close, but we cannot see that he suffers. - The Independent, New YorkRichard Hovey ... must at least be called a true and remarkable poet in his field. He can not only say things in a masterly manner, but he has something impressive to day... Nothing modern since the appearance of Swinburnes Atlanta in Calydon surpasses them these dramas] in virility and classical clearness and perfection of thought. - Joel Be